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how do you add more yarn to knitting projects?

March 18th, 2010 · 5 Comments · Knitting Yarn

i am knitting my friend a baby blanket and i don’t think that one skein of yarn will be enough so how do i add more yarn without unraveling my work?

You can do what is called a "Russian Join" (probably the most universal yarn join w/o loosing the integrity of your work – regardless of what type of pattern you’re doing). And it avoids tying a knot and having it pop up where you wouldn’t want it.

You can find a video here:
http://www.knittinghelp.com/videos/knitting-tips

And here is a picture diagram (very helpful):
http://www.knittinganyway.com/freethings/russianjoin.htm

The second version is my personal favorite b/c you don’t need to cut the yarn to join the yarn.

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5 responses so far ↓

  • 1 chandria03 // Mar 18, 2010 at

    its a bit hard to describe.its easiest to do at beginning of row.leave at least an 8 inch tail for weaving in.take the new ball and wrap as if to knit a stitch.dont use the old string.once u have knitted a stitchwith the new string tie the 2 tails together snug but not so tight u cant knit it.if this doesnt help.type in how to begin a new ball in a search engine
    References :

  • 2 editorgrrl // Mar 18, 2010 at

    Leaving at least a 6- to 8-inch tail of each yarn, just start knitting from the new skein. It will feel weird & loose for the first few stitches, but just keep going. (It’s customary to do this at the beginning of a row so that you can hide the ends along the edge of your work.)

    Never tie knots in your knitting. When you’re done, weave in all the ends with a large, blunt sewing needle — including the tails from the beginning & end of the blanket.

    The first video at http://www.knittinghelp.com/videos/knitting-tips shows how to weave in ends, or here’s an article from Knitty with photos: http://www.knitty.com/ISSUEfall04/FEATfall04TT.html
    References :

  • 3 ? // Mar 18, 2010 at

    I always knot on my next skein. Tie a small neat knot, preferably a square knot. Tie it close into the piece, of course, leaving longish tails (min 4") so you can weave the ends in later. It really won’t show. I have been knitting for years and wear many of my own creations. Tie a knot. It won’t show and works best that way.
    References :

  • 4 mickiinpodunk // Mar 18, 2010 at

    Please don’t use knots, no matter how many people tell you to do it. It isn’t a professional way to add a new skein, and yes, you will need more than one ball of yarn unless you’re using one of those one pound deals. When you no longer have enough yarn to work two more rows (this is about 3 times the width of the piece for each row) take your new ball of yarn, put the very tail in your left hand, with the end over your index finger and about 6 inches to work with, beginning at the edge of the piece. Work the first stitch as usual, on the second stitch insert the right needle through the stitch and under the new yarn, finish your stitch by wrapping it with the old yarn and pulling it through. Next stitch, insert the right needle so it goes over the new yarn and knit as usual. Work several stitches this way and drop the very tail of the new yarn for later.Work the rest of the row and then work the return row. Now, put the old yarn in your left hand and the new yarn in your right and weave in the end of the old yarn (do not worry if there seems to be a bit of the old yarn going to waste, it’s ok) for several stitches. Continue with the new yarn. When your piece is finished you can clip all those tails about a quarter inch from the face of the work and be done with it.

    You can also spit or Russian splice the yarns together, but this doesn’t work with plant fiber or acryllic yarns, it does work with animal yarns. But you split the yarn into plies (half and half) on each end for several inches, lay one half of the old yarn on the one half of the new yarn, spit on them (yeah, I know, I know) and rub them between your hands to felt them a bit. Knit right over this join, leaving the other halves of the plies out of the knitting. These can then be clipped as well.

    BTW, I save these little bits of yarn in a container and in the spring set them out for the birds to use in their nests. Longer pieces can be used to sew seams or buttons on.
    References :
    I have been knitting for 53 years.

  • 5 flyinggoose1211 // Mar 18, 2010 at

    You can do what is called a "Russian Join" (probably the most universal yarn join w/o loosing the integrity of your work – regardless of what type of pattern you’re doing). And it avoids tying a knot and having it pop up where you wouldn’t want it.

    You can find a video here:
    http://www.knittinghelp.com/videos/knitting-tips

    And here is a picture diagram (very helpful):
    http://www.knittinganyway.com/freethings/russianjoin.htm

    The second version is my personal favorite b/c you don’t need to cut the yarn to join the yarn.
    References :
    Pic. diagram of a Russian Join:
    http://www.knittinganyway.com/freethings/russianjoin.htm

    Video of Russian Join:
    http://www.knittinghelp.com/videos/knitting-tips

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