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who know how to get 5 stitches to an inch on round circular knitting needles?

March 16th, 2010 · 5 Comments · Knitting On Circular Needles

Greetings! I’m knitting with a circular knitting needle size8 (as required by the pattern) when I did a Gauge using the same size needle I got 4 stitches per inch. So I went down to a size 7 & I got the same Gauge….:0( Then, I went down to a size, and still got the same result….:0( geting mad’er. Next, I tred a size#4 knitting needles, and then I got the RIGHT Gauge. Why then does the pattern say to USE a size#8 knitting needles? And If I’m going to use a size4 for the "Body" of the sweater, WHAT size am I to use for the "Ribbing?"
Oh, I’m so confused with this project. Can some PLEASE help me? I enjoy knitting in rounds, because there is NO SEAMS. When the sweater is completed, you’re ready to WEAR it….:0)
Thanks A Million for your help in advance….Ksweet2015@comcast.net

Hi!

Are you sure you’re using the correct weight yarn? That would be my first guess, since I haven’t seen you knit. Of course, you could keep the orignally-recommended-size needles (the 8s) and remember that 4 of your stitches equals 5 stitches on the pattern. So, if they say "cast on 100 stitches," for example, you’d only cast on 80 and it would come out the same size — IF and only if your knitting gauge is consistent all the way through. You’d need to remember to decrease by 20% every single stitch count the pattern gives you, too, or your sweater will be lopsided!

You could also figure out the stitch counts yourself for whatever yarn and needles you want. Determine the measurement your sweater needs to be at different points (length, width, where the sleeves or armholes go, etc) and figure out, at 4 stitches per inch, how many you’ll need.

Feel free to email me with questions if I’ve muddied things up for you. I knit without patterns all the time because I like what I like and want to make just that. I knit or sew most of my own clothes — on my own patterns — for that reason.

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5 responses so far ↓

  • 1 thejanith // Mar 16, 2010 at 3:04 pm

    Hi!

    Are you sure you’re using the correct weight yarn? That would be my first guess, since I haven’t seen you knit. Of course, you could keep the orignally-recommended-size needles (the 8s) and remember that 4 of your stitches equals 5 stitches on the pattern. So, if they say "cast on 100 stitches," for example, you’d only cast on 80 and it would come out the same size — IF and only if your knitting gauge is consistent all the way through. You’d need to remember to decrease by 20% every single stitch count the pattern gives you, too, or your sweater will be lopsided!

    You could also figure out the stitch counts yourself for whatever yarn and needles you want. Determine the measurement your sweater needs to be at different points (length, width, where the sleeves or armholes go, etc) and figure out, at 4 stitches per inch, how many you’ll need.

    Feel free to email me with questions if I’ve muddied things up for you. I knit without patterns all the time because I like what I like and want to make just that. I knit or sew most of my own clothes — on my own patterns — for that reason.
    References :

  • 2 dnleaf // Mar 16, 2010 at 3:21 pm

    Yeah…Recommended gauges you have to follow are a big headache…. But there is a very simple remedy for it. Do your own gauge swatch and calculate dimensions for your project using YOUR OWN GAUGE. Here is detail explanation about gauge.
    http://www.smart-knit-crocheting.com/beginner-crochet.html

    This is the way you should calculate number of stitches for any of your projects, It will work for your favorite knitting in rounds also.
    http://www.smart-knit-crocheting.com/crocheting-basics.html

    Good luck with your project!
    References :

  • 3 anjelawolfe // Mar 16, 2010 at 3:34 pm

    something you have to remember, and the reason that everyone includes gauge swatches in their patterns, is that when you give two people the same yarn, needles and instructions, knit a fifteenxfifteen square in stockinette, you’ll get the square, but there could be vastly different numbers of rows and stitches that each person has had to cast on to get the square.

    in much neater words, some knitter’s knit loose and some knit tight and some knit generally right on target.

    Considering, it would probably be a good idea to do a gauge swatch for the ribbing as well.
    References :

  • 4 mickiinpodunk // Mar 16, 2010 at 4:15 pm

    Unless you are using a yarn that is too thin for the pattern or you are not knitting your swatch in the round, something is wrong here. You’d have to knit quite loosely to need to go down four needle sizes to get gauge. Not that this isn’t unheard of, but it’s going to throw off your sweater size in other ways.

    To measure a gauge in a circular pattern, you need to knit your swatch in the round. The best way to do this is to knit the first few inches of the sleeve. You also don’t measure gauge by casting on the same number of stitches the gauge indication tells you to and measure against that. Doesn’t work. You need to cast on at least 30 stitches, work 3 or 4 inches of knitting (yes, I know that’s a lot) and take it off the needles, lay it flat and measure for gauge in the center of this with a ruler over two inches. Put a pin in vertically by the left edge of one stitch and measure across from there for two inches, count your stitches and divide by 2.

    If your pattern calls for a size 8 needle, it probably also calls for knitting with a worsted weight yarn, so if you are using DK or sport weight, or even light worsted for that matter, you’ll have a harder time getting gauge. You may need to change your yarn.
    References :

  • 5 Sarah is getting married! // Mar 16, 2010 at 4:29 pm

    Double check your needles, a US size 8 needle is equivilent to a Uk 4mm needle, so that would work out correct if you are working on mm needles and the pattern calls for US needles. Most good yarn stores will sell a needle checker that you can use to double check the size of all your needles, and is also handy for converting between UK & US sizes. (I get the feeling this may be your problem, as from memory a size 4 is a teeny teeny needle, whereas a 4mm is starndard for knitting DK yarn)

    Good luck & happy knitting
    References :

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