Knitting How To

Knitting How To Tips For Serious Knitters

Knitting How To header image 2

Knitting – How do I ‘slip stitches on to a thread’?

March 6th, 2010 · 6 Comments · Knitting Stitches

I’m a fairly new knitter and have come across something in the pattern that says ‘slip stitches on to a thread’. It’s the body of a knitted bear and the next step in the pattern says to draw up and secure. I have no idea what this means. Can anyone help??

Cut a separate piece of yarn in the same color (easiest is to get it from the other end of the skein). Thread this spare length onto a darning needle and then run the needle through the stitches on the needle, pulling them off the needle.

You will then pull the two ends of your spare thread together and tie off, but I would suggest at this stage you tie a bow and not put a knot into it as you may be using the ends to stitch part of the bear up, or occasionally the stitches are picked up later.

Over time you will get used to knitting terminology – if this was a lesson teaching you to tie your shoe laces, and said ‘draw the laces up and secure’, you would realize what it meant and this is exactly the same thing that you are doing with the yarn.

Hope this helps. Good luck.

Tags:

6 responses so far ↓

  • 1 uk kew // Mar 6, 2010 at

    get a small length of wool . take your stitch and knit it on to the piece of wool as if you were knitting it onto the needle.
    what you are doing is saving those stitches to be picked up again later if you were knitting something like a nose. you could just pick those stitches off onto a safety pin. does that make sense? good luck. im sure you’ll get it right
    References :

  • 2 honeybee // Mar 6, 2010 at

    take a piece of ur wool or some other thread, try and slip the stitches off ur needle onto the thread, u will have to work out how to do it as i cant really explain it, sorry, i use a crotchet hook to pull thread through stitches. then pull both ends of thread so that stitches all close together and tie thread in a knot, that will be neck of ur bear, hope that helps, im not very good at explaining sorry,
    References :

  • 3 lesley c // Mar 6, 2010 at

    It sounds like the pattern wants you to put stitches onto the same yarn that you are using so you can finish off the body of the bear. the step in the pattern says to draw up and secure ( meaning to finish off)
    Another way of finishing off a knitted garment or project.
    References :

  • 4 Sarah D // Mar 6, 2010 at

    I’m sorry!
    I don’t know how to explain.

    Try this book: Knitting for Dummys
    References :

  • 5 Pam D // Mar 6, 2010 at

    Cut a separate piece of yarn in the same color (easiest is to get it from the other end of the skein). Thread this spare length onto a darning needle and then run the needle through the stitches on the needle, pulling them off the needle.

    You will then pull the two ends of your spare thread together and tie off, but I would suggest at this stage you tie a bow and not put a knot into it as you may be using the ends to stitch part of the bear up, or occasionally the stitches are picked up later.

    Over time you will get used to knitting terminology – if this was a lesson teaching you to tie your shoe laces, and said ‘draw the laces up and secure’, you would realize what it meant and this is exactly the same thing that you are doing with the yarn.

    Hope this helps. Good luck.

    References :
    Over 40 years of knitting
    http://www.bestlearntoknit.com

  • 6 Shishkani // Mar 6, 2010 at

    Get a regular needle (not a knitting needle) and put the thread you want to use through the needle. You can use any sort; the large blunt ones used for seaming work will be fine, the kind they call tapestry needles.

    I would do this by just removing the knitting needle . All the loops from the stitches will be loose. At this point you’d have to treat your work carefully so you don’t lose any stitches. Then just pass the threaded needle through each loop, so that you now have all the stitches resting on the thread rather than on a knitting needle.

    If that sounds too scary, then do it one stitch at a time. Hold the knitting needle in your left hand. As if the threaded needle were a knitting needle, slip stitches from the left knitting needle, on to the threaded needle.

    ‘Draw up’ usually means to pull things tight, scrunching the stitches together. Tie the thread that the stitches are on in a knot and pull it tight until all the stitches are bunched up together.
    References :

Leave a Comment