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Why does each row I knit add an additional stitch to the needle?

March 4th, 2010 · 4 Comments · Knitting Stitches

Although I’ve crocheted for years, I’m brand new at knitting. The only things I’ve worked on so far are the Cast On and the Knit stitch. But I notice that after each row I knit, I am inadvertently added a stitch to the needle.

For example, if I start with 20 cast on stitches, after knitting 2 rows, I now have 22 stitches on my needle after the row is completed.

Why is this happening? I’m assuming it shouldn’t…

Thanks in advance for your help!

Karen

what you are doing you are making accidental increases and it is the common mistake beginners make.
when you turn your work to start a new row make sure you are not slipping a stitch you are probably making accidental yarn over that is an increase stitch

here you go this will explain much better because she will show you while knitting how you make that mistake

this website can also explain how to avoid extra stitches
http://www.lionbrand.com/cgi-bin/faq-search.cgi?store=/stores/eyarn&faqKey=72&language=

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4 responses so far ↓

  • 1 vnelson85 // Mar 4, 2010 at

    you are right, you shouldnt get extra stitches. at the beginning of the row, your yarn should be to the front and then to the back otherwise you are knitting the first stitch twice. this is where your extra stitches are coming from.
    References :

  • 2 thejanith // Mar 4, 2010 at

    I don’t know where in your row, but somewhere you are likely not sliding your stitch all the way off the needle. That’s how I usually get my extras. It’s not big deal, as long as you’re not working on a highly-complicated project. If it’s something simple like potholders, a scarf, simple slippers, a dishcloth, etc, it’s very easy to fix. Once you have figured out how not to add these stitches anymore, stick your working needle through two stitches (instead of one, as you normally do) and knit them as though they were one stitch. There. One stitch gone. Do a regular row, and then do this again on the next row. Voila! Back to 20 stitches.

    Of course, if you are a perfectionaist, you can rip everything out and start over instead — once you’ve figured out how not to add extra stitches. I prefer fixing it.
    References :
    17 years’ worth of fixing my own knitting mistakes — and making beautiful knitwear.

  • 3 ♥mat // Mar 4, 2010 at

    what you are doing you are making accidental increases and it is the common mistake beginners make.
    when you turn your work to start a new row make sure you are not slipping a stitch you are probably making accidental yarn over that is an increase stitch

    here you go this will explain much better because she will show you while knitting how you make that mistake
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iI-VlCRqbNU

    this website can also explain how to avoid extra stitches
    http://www.lionbrand.com/cgi-bin/faq-search.cgi?store=/stores/eyarn&faqKey=72&language=
    References :

  • 4 mickiinpodunk // Mar 4, 2010 at

    Make sure that when you turn the work around (put the filled needle in your left hand) that you bring the yarn to the back to work the next row by bringing it under the needle tip, not over it. When you go over the needle tip you often will pull the last stitch from the previous row up far enough on the needle so that it looks like two stitches to be knit and this will create the increase. You can see if this is so by checking the columns of stitches underneath the stitches on the needle, if the outer stitches have no or only one stitch below them, this is the problem.

    If you are splitting the yarn, again, you’ll have a stitch column that originates somewhere other than from the cast on, these need to be ripped back to, since splitting weakens the yarn and increases the chances of yarn failure in the future. If you are making yarn overs in the middle of a row you’ll find a hole in the work, the stitches immediately over these in the same column can safely be dropped, and the excess yarn strands will work themselves into the knitting when you wash and block it.
    References :
    I have been knitting for 54 years.

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